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Battling The Adverse Effects Of Atelophobia

Lets say that a job-seeker is about to meet a potential employer. Does he feel squeamish, nauseated, nervous, out of breath, or any inexplicable emotion immediately at the sight of the employer? Does he feel shaky and dizzy? Does he suddenly feel incompetent? Does he feel his nerves getting the best of him? If he dismisses the behavior as irrational, he might be suffering from a case of atelophobia a phobia of inadequacy.

Fortunately, for the treatment of atelophobia, different approaches of psychotherapy are effective. Popular approaches are systemic therapy, insight-oriented therapy, and hypnosis for confidence.

Understanding Atelophobia

Symptoms:

Chest pains Constant desire to abandon uncomfortable situations Constant pessimism Depression Difficulty in concentrating dizziness Impulsiveness Irrational behavior Lopsided interpretations Low self-worth Moodiness Overly emotional reactions Perspiration Panic attacks Shakiness or trembling sensations Shortness of breath Unrealistic responses

Atelophobia comes from the Greek words ateles (which translates to imperfect) and phobos (which means fear). It falls into the classification of anxiety disorders and refers to the haunting feeling of inadequacy, imperfection, and worthlessness. While it is a mental illness, it can result to experiences of both emotional and physical symptoms.

Should There Be a Battle against Atelophobia?

Since atelophobia is considerable as an unhealthy phobia, it is best to seek treatment as soon as possible. Usually, the fear drives atelophobics to think illogically. If inconvenienced, they will take the first random action to leave the scene. Before it exacerbates, the intervention of psychotherapists is necessary.

The subject of competition, for one, can wreck an atelophobic persons self-image. While it has its own advantages, atelophobia can cause irreparable emotional damage and mental trauma. Especially if that individual finds another on top of him, he will feel an endless wave of self-loathing. He will reprimand himself for his underperformance. Even after the competition is over, an atelophobic persons self-esteem will continually decrease.

How to build confidence can help

With low confidence, the battle against atelophobia, as well as against other unhealthy phobias, may be difficult to win. An atelophobic will begin doubting his abilities toward the brink of making comparisons. Since he doesnt think that hes good enough, he ends up feeling disappointed, hurt, and furious. On the other hand, with a high level of confidence, an individual can be triumphant easily. Since hes certain of his self-worth, he doesnt question his abilities. If at a loss, he refuses to feel inadequate; instead, he aims to do better next time. Granted he has high self-esteem, hes not prone to letting the fear take charge.

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